Vocation Profile - Benedictine Abbey of St. Andrew

Benedictine Abbey of St. Andrew

Rev. Damien Toilolo O.S.B.
Vocation Contact
PO Box 40
Valyermo, CA 93563

661-944-2178
damien@valyermo.com
www.saintandrewsabbey.com

International?No
Professed members20
Year founded1956
Generalate/motherhouseAutonomous
Province/federation

(Arch)dioceses
Los Angeles, CA
Mission
Our Benedictine monastic community of men leads a balanced life of prayer and work. Special retreat ministry is given to adults and youth.
Qualifications
Good health, mental stability and maturity required. At least a high school graduate, preferably a college degree. Between ages of 21-45.
Formation
Interested men make a retreat at the Abbey to experience community life. They then may apply as observers, the first stage in the process of monastic formation. Observers live in the monastery and share fully in our community's life of prayer and work. After about six months, the observer petitions for acceptance as a novice. If accepted, he is accepted as a candidate, usually about six months long. Classes are taken in subjects which include: monastic history and spirituality; the Rule of St. Benedict; the Sacred Scriptures; liturgy; and canon law. Entrance into the novitiate is marked by the ceremony of investiture, at which time the candidate receives the black Benedictine habit and a new name. At the end of the novitiate, the conventual chapter of professed monks determines whether the novice should make vows. The novice then professes triennial (also called "simple") vows, binding for three years. During the juniorate, the monk continues his studies and formation, often at a Benedictine university or seminary. If he is fully accepted into the community, solemn vows follow. During their formation some monks discern a call to the priesthood, while others discover that they are called to ministries which do not require ordination.
Age range/limit
21 to 45
Belated vocations?
Yes: We do consider older vocations.

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