Vocation Profile - Carmelite Nuns of Port Tobacco

Carmelite Nuns of Port Tobacco

Mother Virginia Marie O.C.D.
Prioress
5678 Mount Carmel Rd
La Plata, MD 20646

301-934-1654
contact@carmelofporttobacco.com
www.carmelofporttobacco.com

International?No
Professed members8
Year founded1976
Generalate/motherhouseAutonomous
Province/federationAutonomous

(Arch)dioceses
Washington, DC
Mission
Our apostolate is prayer - for the Church, especially priests, and for the whole world. Our charism is guided by our foundress, St. Teresa of Avila, and by St. John of the Cross. St. Therese of Lisieux has also influenced many who have been drawn to this life of total giving of self to God. We are cloistered Carmelite nuns, following strict papal enclosure. The essence of the Carmelite contemplative life is: living in the presence of God, in imitation of our most pure Mother Mary and the prophet Elijah.
Qualifications
Women need to have a minimum of one year of work or college experience, good health, maturity to make a life-long commitment, prayerfulness, and some knowledge of Carmelite spirituality, obtained by reading one or more of their saints' writings.
Formation
Live-in experience: one to three months; postulancy: six to twelve months; receive Carmelite habit and then two-year novitiate; make first profession and stay three more years in the novitiate; make solemn profession and then receive the black veil.
Age range/limit
20-40
Belated vocations?
No

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